Difference between revisions of "Talk:Recovering crashes manually"

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(Recovery)
(Clear out older Q's and A's and answer to jklp)
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==Out of disk space crash==
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== Windows batch file renaming utilities ==  
OMFG. Altho I had several gigabytes of disk space when I started editing my hour-and-a-half audio commentary, Audacity used it all and crashed. It gave me an error about files not being found, so I deleted the track I was working on, saved, and closed the application. But when I open it now, I get "can't open" a certain .au file and ALL tracks are blank.
 
  
<font color = "green">
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[[User:jklp|jklp]] 30 August 2008: I removed the link to Flexible Renamer as I couldn't figure out how to rename the files in the order required by the recovery tool, or figure out if it was actually possible with Flexible Renamer, hence why I suggested Better File Rename which easily provided the functionality that was required (though at the cost that it was shareware). If you were to leave the link up for Flexible Renamer, it might be a good idea to specify an example of how to set it up to perform the appropriate rename? --
:Any tracks which have been closed when saving will be irrecoverable.</font>
 
  
I've tried the recovery utility. I've looked in the temp folder. Apparently shutting down Audacity cleared the temp folder AND the working folder.
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:'''[[User:Galeandrews|Gale]] 30 Aug 08 07:31 UTC:''' Unfortunately you provided no summary of your edit, so the reason for your removing the Flexible Renamer link was unknown. I found the link that you deleted was dead, so assumed that to be the reason. On trying that app. I could not figure immediately how to achieve what was required either, so the link has been replaced with specific instructions for another free app (which in any case is a superior file manager to Windows Explorer).
 
 
<font color = "green">
 
:Saving a project clears out any data in the temporary folder.  If you save an empty project it will have no data. </font>
 
 
 
The working folder has nothing but snippets I deleted. I'm the sort of person who saves regularly and backs up files in multiple locations, but Audacity's working files quickly grow to multiple gigabytes, so I can't afford to have them in multiple places, even with moving finished previous work to a backup drive. I've lost hours and hours of recording and editing work. I am stunned that the application is this gluttonous for disk space AND corrupts the file when it runs out of disk space. I'm just stunned. --[[User:Tysto|Tysto]] 19:04, 8 June 2007 (PDT)
 
 
 
<font color = "green">
 
:If you have been using File > Save Project while you have been editing then even if you ran out of disc space the last save of the project should be exactly as it was saved. To use less space consider setting the default sample format on the Quality tab of preferences to 16 bit instead of 32 bit. The Undo history is what takes space up, whatever sample format you use. If you find you are running out of space, save your Project, exit Audacity and restart, or go to View > History and discard some of the Undo levels.  </font>
 
 
 
AIUI 1.3.6 has an autosave every 5 mins option which would prevent that.
 
[[User:NT|NT]] 03:51, 4 November 2007 (PST)
 
 
 
<font color = "green">
 
:The current Beta is 1.3.3 and the autosave is designed to ensure you don't lose more than 5 minutes of unsaved edits (you can change the default to 1 minute). If you had already saved a project just before a crash there  would not be any automatic crash recovery as there is no unsaved data - you'd just reopen the project file. </font>
 
 
 
==Recovery==
 
Have been trying to use the instructions here to recover an unsaved project using Audacity, but either I'm a retard or the instructions are not too clear. (Please, no voting :) )
 
 
 
If anyone that knows how to do it feels like explaining it more, great. Meanwhile I'll try one of the standalone tools.
 
[[User:NT|NT]] 03:51, 4 November 2007 (PST)
 
 
 
<font color = "green">
 
:The instructions could do with rewriting but as we keep hoping that the new stable 1.4.0 will be out soon (making the current instructions largely redundant) there is not a lot of motivation to do it. Seeing as it's you :-), you can ask here if you have some specific question, but please tell us what operating system you are on.
 
 
 
:Gale </font>
 
 
 
 
 
Thanks Gale. I'll try the external util first, and come back if I get stuck
 
[[User:NT|NT]] 14:50, 4 November 2007 (PST)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I removed the link to Flexible Renamer as I couldn't figure out how to rename the files in the order required by the recovery tool, or figure out if it was actually possible with Flexible Renamer, hence why I suggested Better File Rename which easily provided the functionality that was required (though at the cost that it was shareware). 
 
 
 
If you were to leave the link up for Flexible Renamer, it might be a good idea to specify an example of how to set it up to perform the appropriate rename? --[[User:jklp|jklp]] 30 August 2008
 

Revision as of 07:39, 30 August 2008

Windows batch file renaming utilities

jklp 30 August 2008: I removed the link to Flexible Renamer as I couldn't figure out how to rename the files in the order required by the recovery tool, or figure out if it was actually possible with Flexible Renamer, hence why I suggested Better File Rename which easily provided the functionality that was required (though at the cost that it was shareware). If you were to leave the link up for Flexible Renamer, it might be a good idea to specify an example of how to set it up to perform the appropriate rename? --

Gale 30 Aug 08 07:31 UTC: Unfortunately you provided no summary of your edit, so the reason for your removing the Flexible Renamer link was unknown. I found the link that you deleted was dead, so assumed that to be the reason. On trying that app. I could not figure immediately how to achieve what was required either, so the link has been replaced with specific instructions for another free app (which in any case is a superior file manager to Windows Explorer).